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Today: Wed, August 27 2014  -  Last modified: April, 26 2007
 Repression and Police State
27 August 2014
 
 
The way the police have treated Cliff Richard is completely unacceptable
Due process has been subverted in a case that raises urgent questions about civil liberties
by Geoffrey Robertson
 sub-topic» Police

Last year, apparently, a complaint was made to police that the singer had indecently assaulted a youth in Sheffield a quarter of a century ago. The police had a duty to investigate, seek any corroborating evidence, and then – and only if they had reasonable grounds to suspect him of committing an offence – to give him the opportunity to refute those suspicions before a decision to charge is made.

But here, police subverted due process by waiting until Richard had left for vacation, and then orchestrating massive publicity for the raid on his house, before making any request for interview and before any question could arise of arresting or charging him.

 more» 
20 June 2014
 
 
Police Compared To A Foreign Military
by Christopher Cantwell
 sub-topic» Police

I shouldn’t have to explain this to anarchists. Police, simply by being police, are a threat to your safety. They are sworn to “uphold the law” which almost exclusively consists of threats to initiate force against peaceful people. They are paid through theft that they justify by renaming taxation, and citation. They have no legitimate authority to do this.

 more» 
29 April 2014
 
 
Police [Brutality]: A Crime Against Civilization
by Bill Buppert
 sub-topic» Police

You cannot beat, subdue, strangle, tase, shoot, baton, kick and injure your friends and neighbors.

The police can.

You cannot kidnap your friends and neighbors, stuff them into a car and steal them from their loved ones.

The police can.

You cannot drag your friends and neighbors before a robed government employee to be sentenced to a random cage to spend the time the aforementioned employee judges to be correct.

The police can.

 more» 
06 April 2014
 
 
Christian preacher John Craven 'held without food or water'
by the BBC
 sub-topic» Police

A Christian street preacher who was held by police without food or water for 15 hours after he was arrested over comments he made to two gay teenagers has been given £13,000 in compensation.

 more» 
12 January 2014
 
 
Walking in Broad Daylight is "Suspicious"
by William Norman Grigg
 sub-topic» Police

The officer wasn’t investigating a specific disappearance. This was a warrantless detention, conducted without probable cause or reasonable suspicion, and swaddled in an entirely implausible rationale – at least to anybody unwilling to pretend that there is something suspicious about a couple of cheerful young adults walking on a sidewalk in broad daylight.

 more» 
18 December 2013
 
 
Trigger Happy in New York
by Timothy J. Taylor
 sub-topic» Police

Shoot first and find excuses later is the new motto for cowardly police officers in New York City who have no qualms about firing bullets into a crowd of innocent bystanders while attempting to gun down an unarmed man.

 more» 
20 November 2013
 
 
Officer paranoia
by Kent McManigal
 sub-topic» Police

But cops aren't relaxed. They are frantic, paranoid, and trigger happy. They understand instinctively (even if they don't allow themselves to admit it) that their own actions have made them less safe than they would have been in the past. People in general are not worse- cops are. And there are real-world consequences that go along with that.

 more» 
12 August 2013
 
 
Police: Because of "Free Staters," we need an armored vehicle
by Tom Woods
 sub-topic» Police

The Free Staters in New Hampshire are among the express reasons given for why the Concord police department is applying to purchase an armored vehicle.

The Free Staters, who are nonviolent, are lumped into the category of “domestic terrorism.” For not wanting anyone to use violence.

 more» 
25 April 2013
 
 
On the Boston Lockdown
by Anthony Gregory
 sub-topic» Police

They did not do this to pursue the DC sniper, or to go after the Kennedy assassin, and I fear the precedent. It is eerie that this happened in an American city, and it should be eerie to you, no matter where you fall on the spectrum. You can tell me that most people in Boston were happy to go along with it, but that’s not really the point, either. If two criminals can bring an entire city to its knees like this with the help of the state, then terrorism truly is a winning strategy. (And we should also keep in mind that the overwhelming majority of the massive police response did not aid in capturing the suspect—it ultimately turned on that old fashioned breakthrough—a normal denizen calling the authorities with information.)

 more» 
11 February 2013
 
 
Police spies stole identities of dead children
by Paul Lewis and Rob Evans
 sub-topic» Police

Britain's largest police force stole the identities of an estimated 80 dead children and issued fake passports in their names for use by undercover police officers.

The Metropolitan police secretly authorised the practice for covert officers infiltrating protest groups without consulting or informing the children's parents.

 more» 
02 June 2012
 
 
Chicago Cops are the Terrorists
by Dave Lindorff
 sub-topic» Police

This kind of entrapment and official deceit by police should alarm every American. It’s bad enough when police plant evidence and lie about evidence in order to win convictions, since it means innocent people will be sent to prison or worse. But with the new post 9-11 terrorism laws, like the state terrorism statutes in Illinois being applied in these cases, it becomes far more difficult for a victim of such police and prosecutorial misconduct to challenge the case against her or him. In terror cases, the government can claim “national security” to hide the evidence and even the identity of the witnesses from the defendants and the courts, the jury and the public, and can avoid ever being questioned about it publicly. In a worst case, the federal government doesn’t even need to bring the case to trial. If the victim is accused of being a terrorist, under the latest National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) and various executive orders, that person can be locked away indefinitely without trial — exactly the kind of abuse that led American colonists to rise up against their British colonial overlords 237 years ago.

 more»