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Today: Thu, November 26 2015  -  Last modified: April, 26 2007
29 October 2015
Opportunities for Collaboration with Political Christians
by Kevin Vallier
 sub-topic» General

Police Reform – the black community in the US is overwhelmingly Christian and are typically much more active in church than any other ethnic group. Many politically Christian black pastors and congregations fight the good fight against abuses of police power. Libertarians have and should join them in protesting against racial profiling, excessive uses of force, stop-and-frisk, etc. I see a lot of potential for collaboration between libertarians and black Christians.

24 August 2015
The pope is not a Christian
by Bob Weber
 sub-topic» General

Would Jesus use the subversive tactics of warmists? Would Jesus lie to get his way?

Would Jesus place blame where it doesn’t belong – ie bear false witness?

Would Jesus force anyone into an non-optional course of action based on the above three?

Would Jesus try to encourage the elimination of human beings as the warmists want?

08 August 2015
Nuns and Ghouls
by Nathan Barton
 sub-topic» General

Do you want to truly be “pro-life” in a non-hypocritical way? Then reject the power and control of government, take responsibility for your own life, for the care and well-being of your own family, for helping your friends and neighbors and fellow church members, and help end this corrupt and hypocritical system which murders the innocent from conception to old age, and which destroys the opportunities for all to have a better life NOT at the expense of others.

21 July 2015
The Nine Lies of Today’s Church
A call for massive ‘Reformation’ – before it is too late
by Andrew Strom
 sub-topic» General

Much of the church is living a lie. Many inside her are told continuously that they are "OK" - that they are saved and headed for heaven. Nothing could be further from the truth. Multitudes of them are headed directly for hell. The systemized LYING that is going on has deceived the leaders and the people alike. It is the blind leading the blind. We need to contend for these people - desperately. Much of the church is "lost". They are mired in deception - an entire system of deception.

03 February 2015
Communion and Consumerism
by Gregory Jensen
 sub-topic» General

The anthropologist Mary Douglas helps us translate this theology into a prudential vision of the economic when she argues that Keynes got it backwards. Production is not in the service of consumption. It is rather that consumption serves production. This means for Douglas (like Schmemann) not only the production of material wealth as Smith argues but also—and more foundationally—social meaning. Human consumption is in the service of creating, sustaining and deepening community — above all else the Eucharistic community of the Church.

20 January 2015
Time to get serious
by Linda Woodhead
 sub-topic» General

There is also a gap in values between Church and people on socio-political issues. Most people in Britain are now centre-right, and Anglicans are even further to the right than the majority. For example, nearly 70 per cent of "Anglicans" believe that the welfare system has created a culture of dependency - almost ten percentage points higher than the general population. But official church teaching is positioned much further to the left of both the population and, even more so, Anglicans.

This leaves the Church out of step with most of its supporters, as well as its detractors. It is both more left-wing in politics and more conservative in morals, and both more paternalist and more puritanical.

21 October 2014
Welfare, Work and Human Dignity
by Dylan Pahman
 sub-topic» General

Acknowledging this, Christians not only have a duty to work for virtue in their souls and the production of material goods in the world but better to encourage and enable others to fulfill this divine commandment as well. Part of this means never looking at another person as useless. God created us to work, and if our primary goal is virtue, there is something everyone can do to work for that, no matter even if they have a criminal record or mental, emotional, or physical disability. Perhaps not everyone’s work can take the form of gainful employment, but work remains a duty to all and an important matter of human dignity, a cause to which we owe “the sweat of [our] face” (Genesis 3:19) as well.

21 September 2014
Our Sentimental Humanitarian Age
by Samuel Gregg
 sub-topic» General

Despite its claims to take the mind seriously, sentimental humanitarianism is also rather “uncomfortable” (to use classic sentimental humanitarian language) with any substantive understanding of reason. It tends to reduce most debates to exchanges of feelings. You know you’re dealing with a sentimental humanitarian whenever someone responds to arguments with expressions such as “Well, I just feel…” or “You can’t say that,” or (the ultimate trump-card) “That’s hurtful.”

08 February 2014
Jesus and Mo: it's time to pick a horse
by Charles Kiendjian
 sub-topic» General

It’s tempting to think this is a difficult legal or moral conundrum. It isn’t. There are difficult legal and moral issues out there but this is not one of them. The question before us is very simple: do we have the right to depict Mohammed? It’s a simple question and so it deserves a simple answer. The answer is either yes or no. My answer is yes. If your answer is “yes, but”, then sorry that’s just not good enough. If you have to pause for thought before answering the question then you’ve probably already decided the answer is no.

11 January 2014
Why Not Force People to Attend Church?
by Jacob G. Hornberger
 sub-topic» General

Most Americans would undoubtedly oppose a law requiring everyone to attend church. They would say that whether a person attends church or not is his business, not the business of the state or the majority. They would also say that freedom entails the right to not attend church, not worship God, and not even believe in God. They would oppose such a law even if they were convinced that the law would produce good results.

07 December 2013
My Religion: Liberty!
by Timothy J. Taylor
 sub-topic» General

That’s right! My religion is liberty! At least I believe in the concept of liberty just as much and just as fervently as any Catholics or Protestants believe in the teachings of Jesus Christ. And I am just as offended and aggrieved as they are when the government forces me by law to comply with mandates which clearly violate my right to liberty.

01 June 2013
How Strongly do Believers Believe: Hostorical Evidence
by David Friedman
 sub-topic» General

For those of us who do not believe in religion, it is tempting to see other people's belief as only semi-real, as more like my belief in the world of Lord of the Rings (the book, which I read early enough so I had to wait for the second volume to be published, and have reread many times since) than my belief in Australia. It is tempting to interpret our picture of how religious people were in the past as an artifact of filtered data, our sources for the relevant history largely consisting of accounts written by clerics, a point made by Georges Duby, a prominent medieval historian, in a book that used a rare secular source to provide a balancing picture. But it is hard to see how one can give a complete account of history, or even of the present world, without concluding that for a substantial number of people Heaven really was, or is, as real as Australia.

30 May 2013
Pope and State: No Separation
by Timothy J. Taylor
 sub-topic» General

With all due respect to Pope Francis, his philosophy regarding money sounds like a typical socialist/communist rant demanding a worldwide redistribution of wealth from the have’s to the have not’s; the producers to the takers; the hard working to the lazy; and the ambitious to the complacent.