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Today: Tue, September 27 2016  -  Last modified: April, 26 2007
 Communication
18 September 2016
 
 
Political Correctness – Leftist Ploy or Mental Illness?
by L. Neil Smith
 sub-topic» General

Political correctness, however, is more than just a simple matter of sexuality, of putative sexism, or even of race and racism. It is nothing more than a childish demand never to be contradicted. It is the use of one”s pretended vulnerability as a weapon, which is the precise definition of passive-aggressive behavior. As such, its existence on any university campus—supposedly the sanctuary of free speech and freedom of thought—is completely unacceptable.

 more» 
30 July 2016
 
 
Virtue Signaling: Why Political Debates on the Internet are So Often Pointless
by Dan Sanchez
 sub-topic» General

Imagine a world-wide libertarian community that consists of fewer Internet virtue-signalers and would-be politicos, and an ever-rising number of entrepreneurial, wealth-building, value-creating, life-affirming individuals who astound and inspire all who know them. What exemplars of, and walking arguments for, the greatness of liberty such men and women would be.

Maybe freedom lovers should stop expending so much energy bashing our heads against the brick wall of policy disputation, and instead try the open door of appealing to self-interest: by promoting the freedom philosophy, not just as a political philosophy, but as a life philosophy.

 more» 
21 June 2016
 
 
Liberty in the Reputation Economy
by Jacob Ex Machina
 sub-topic» General

Not all reputational attack is bad. Sometimes it is justified. But it shouldn’t be without cost - that's a recipe for an internet overrun by sadistic trolls who get their lulz out of attacking people. If there were some risk of a cultural backlash against people who are too enthusiastic about attacking others, we would all be more safe.

The principle I suggest for determining whether or not an attack is justified is probably something like a right to privacy. Privacy is a fundamental plank of liberty, as enshrined in the fourth amendment to the US Constitution.

 more» 
30 May 2016
 
 
Abuse of power
by Competitive Enterprise Institute
 sub-topic» General

Regardless of one’s views on climate change, every American should reject the use of government power to harass or silence those who hold differing opinions. This intimidation campaign sets a dangerous precedent and threatens the rights of anyone who disagrees with the government’s position—whether it’s vaccines, GMOs, or any other politically charged issue. Law enforcement officials should never use their powers to silence participants in political debates.

 more» 
22 May 2016
 
 
Flying Dog Brewery Wins First Amendment Battle, Uses Proceeds to Promote Free Speech
by Elizabeth Nolan Brown
 sub-topic» General

"We don’t like ... arbitrary authoritarianism,” Flying Dog CEO Jim Caruso said in a lengthy Brightest Young Things profile about his company last August. "The market should decide. If they don’t like our beer or our names, they can choose not to buy it." He added: "We do believe that freedom of speech is the last defense against tyranny."

 more» 
18 May 2016
 
 
Newsnight
by Pete North
 sub-topic» General

While we could demand that the BBC restore its content to a more sober format, demanding depth rather than volume, it would be a waste of time. You are asking the impossible. Like asking a dolphin to ride a bicycle. Dolphins are superficially smart creatures who can comprehend certain concepts and may even understand how to ride a bicycle, perhaps even comprehending the gravitational forces in play, but a dolphin is simply not physically equipped to climb out of the water and get pedalling, even if the bicycle has stabilisers.

 more» 
12 March 2016
 
 
The Inconvenient Facts the Media Ignore about Climate Change
by Rep. Lamar Smith
 sub-topic» General

Americans in large numbers are turning off TV newscasts, canceling subscriptions to newspapers, and seeking other sources of news. Distrust of the national media has hit an all-time high.

According to a recent Gallup poll, six in ten Americans now have little or no confidence in the national media to report the news fully, accurately, and fairly. A recent Pew Research Center survey found that 65 percent of Americans believe that the national news media have a negative effect on our country.

 more» 
28 February 2016
 
 
My favourite sources of informed comment
by D.J. Webb
 sub-topic» General

We don’t need the state to direct thought. I find I’m very well informed via my own reading, choosing my own sources. The stupefaction of the populace seems to be a key state aim: those who know nothing can’t challenge the direction of policy. Make it a habit never to listen to the BBC: you couldn’t do better than consult these sources of information on a regular basis.

 more» 
19 February 2016
 
 
Control Alt Delete: Time to re-boot the IP Bill
by Liberty
 sub-topic» General

It is clear that the Government’s new surveillance proposals are deeply flawed which is why we are calling for complete overhaul of the draft Investigatory Powers Bill (IP Bill). To join us please sign our Safe and Sound 8 Point Plan now.

In the last ten days three cross-party parliamentary committees have raised serious concerns against the IP Bill. When your own people are telling you something’s up it might be the time to start listening.

 more» 
08 February 2016
 
 
The contracting space for free speech
by D.J. Webb
 sub-topic» General

The fact that these are our major news sources places a key burden on them to report the news—not just select facts supporting one point of view—and, where comment is allowed, to allow free comment, particularly on articles where an opinion is being peddled. C.P. Scott specifically recognized the need to report the news in untainted fashion: it seems clear that no media outlet in the UK today adheres to those principles. The Guardian and the BBC are among the worst in peddling jaundiced and biased versions of the news, stripped of many relevant facts, while, possibly, The Daily Mail (including its Sunday analogue, The Mail on Sunday), is one of the best in terms of reporting inconvenient items of news and allowing comment thereupon.

 more» 
02 February 2016
 
 
Free Speech in an Age of Government Bullies, Corporate Censors and Compliant Citizens – Part 2
by John W. Whitehead
 sub-topic» General

The First Amendment is a steam valve. It allows people to speak their minds, air their grievances and contribute to a larger dialogue that hopefully results in a more just world. When there is no steam valve—when there is no one to hear what the people have to say—frustration builds, anger grows and people become more volatile and desperate to force a conversation.

 more» 
01 February 2016
 
 
Free Speech in an Age of Government Bullies, Corporate Censors and Compliant Citizens – Part 1
by John W. Whitehead
 sub-topic» General

We’ve entered into an egotistical, insulated, narcissistic era in which free speech has become regulated speech: to be celebrated when it reflects the values of the majority and tolerated otherwise, unless it moves so far beyond our political, religious and socio-economic comfort zones as to be rendered dangerous and unacceptable.

 more» 
22 December 2015
 
 
A Conspiracy of Fear-mongers
by Sheldon Richman
 sub-topic» General

Why do the government, the media establishment, and an assortment of consultants traffic in fear?

It's not a hard question. Many people profit from fear-mongering about terrorism. Politicians and bureaucrats gain more power. They also gain access to more money (through borrowing, that is, taxation of future generations). That money ends up in the terrorism industry, a constellation of firms that sell the government endless quantities of goods and services.

No presidential candidate dare tell the truth because rivals will portray him or her as a weak-kneed, head-in-the-sand appeaser. Fear-mongering brings the worst to the top.

 more» 
19 December 2015
 
 
Is Credible Media Both Anti-state and Anti-War?
by Anthony Wile
 sub-topic» General

The media revolution taking place in the US is far broader than one that pits conservatives against liberals. It is one that affects every part of the national conversation. I strongly believe that broad cross-sections of the population find parts of the so-called conservative agenda to be just as offensive as conservatives find parts of the liberal agenda to be.

 more» 
10 December 2015
 
 
World Class Journalist Spills The Beans & Admits Mainstream Media Is Completely Fake
by Arjun Walia
 sub-topic» General

Ever since Operation Mockingbird, a CIA-based initiative to control mainstream media, more and more people are expressing their concern that what we see in the media is nothing short of brainwashing. This is also evident by blatant lies that continue to spam the TV screen, especially when it comes to topics such as health, food, war (‘terrorism‘), poverty, and more.

 more» 
10 October 2015
 
 
What's Libertarian About Betting?
by Bryan Caplan
 sub-topic» General

Now suppose my Betting Norm were universally accepted. Any public figure who refuses to bet large sums on his literal statements is an instant laughingstock, a figure of fun. What happens? Political hyperbole ends for politicians and pundits alike. Hysterical doom-saying and promises of utopia vanish from public discourse. No one serious can afford them! As a result, it becomes very rhetorically difficult to make the case for government to do anything - or at least anything new. Without an inspiring case for government action, government sits still.

 more» 
29 May 2015
 
 
Why It’s So Hard to Convince Warmists
by Matt Manos
 sub-topic» General

Penetrating rational ignorance is tough because the position warmists have taken isn’t based on logic. Their position is actually based on an appeal to authority. To question the rationally ignorant warmist is to question the field of science as a whole (to be a science denier) or to question the leadership of their favorite bellwether personalities. This will cause the rationally ignorant warmist to become defensive and try to stand up for their favorite bellwether. The rationally ignorant will also point to their favorite bellwethers and say, “Who am I to doubt all these intelligent people?” It’s intellectually offshoring. It’s lazy. It’s human nature.

 more» 
18 April 2015
 
 
Liberty takes fight against mass surveillance to European Court
by Liberty
 sub-topic» General

Liberty has filed an appeal with the European Court of Human Rights against the Investigatory Powers Tribunal’s ruling that UK intelligence agencies’ mass surveillance activities are legal.

Liberty is challenging the Tribunal’s December 2014 judgment that GCHQ’s Tempora programme – which sees the agency intercept and process billions of private communications every day – complies with human rights law.

The appeal also challenges the Tribunal’s finding that it is lawful for UK’s Intelligence Services to access data gathered in bulk under the mass electronic surveillance programmes PRISM and Upstream operated by the US’ National Security Agency (NSA).

 more» 
08 April 2015
 
 
The Sexualization of Libertarianism – A Manifesto
by Avens O’Brien
 sub-topic» General

There is a saying I heard in college, that “communism works great in theory until you add people”. My more liberal friends love to tell me that “libertarianism works great in theory until you add people”, but they’re completely wrong. with people, because it is the only philosophy which recognizes people for their very natures. People are self-interested, they’re selfish and greedy and they want for themselves. They may want other things as well, but they are primarily concerned with their own survival and their own success. Libertarianism, by allowing for that fact, recognizes that each of us will pursue our own desires, and thus the moral imperative is simply that we step back when our desires conflict with another’s. My right to swing my fist ends where your body begins.

 more» 
25 March 2015
 
 
Liberal or Libertarian?
by David Davis
 sub-topic» General

Let me say that properly. I favour ditching and disowning the word “LIBERTARIAN”.

I favour recapturing the word LIBERAL from the enemyclass of the GramscoFabiaNazis. It’s our property, it means what we mean, we invented it and they STOLE IT. We must “regain what has been stolen.” “Liberal” means “in favour of liberty”. “Libertarian” does mean that but it sounds bad and dodgy and wrong, and has also been captured by “anarchist libertarians”, which is to say: another awfully-repellent batch of Nazi authoritarian leftoid psychopaths – which is why ti now simply will not do. Never try to defend ground you cannot hold; never “reinforce failure”.

 more» 
21 March 2015
 
 
The Rhetoric of Deception: A Lesson from Karl Rove
by Christopher Witt
 sub-topic» General

Rhetoric is neither good nor bad in itself. Its legitimacy is determined by how it is used (honestly or deceptively) and for what end it is used (for good or for ill).

The deceptive use of rhetoric is nothing new, certainly not in politics, nor is it limited to any particular faction.

 more» 
26 February 2015
 
 
The facts of evolution: fighting the Endarkenment
by Gerald Weissman
 sub-topic» General

Those of us who practice experimental science are living in the best of times and the worst of times, and I’m not talking about A Tale of Two Cities, but a tale of two cultures. The prospects for each day in science have never been more splendid, while our larger culture seems caught in a slough of despond. In the last half century, we’ve landed on the moon, sampled Mars, and deciphered the human genome. Our new technology permits us to clone genes on chips and dial China from the Palm® in our hand. The biological revolution has cracked new diseases as they arose (Lyme, HIV, SARS) and blunted the hurt of the old (cancer, cardiovascular disease, inflammation). We’ve doubled the longevity of fruit flies and roundworms in the lab and increased human life span in the developed world by a decade and a half.

Meanwhile, much of society at large is beating a hasty retreat to the dark ages: the wars of religion are back, superstition threatens our schools and Bible-thumpers preach that Darwin got it wrong. Our heritage of reason, formed in the enlightenment, is becoming eclipsed by what a cynic might call the endarkenment. It’s no trivial matter when the editor of Science, Donald Kennedy. asks us whether it’s “Twilight for the Enlightenment”? Last year, for example, Gallup reported that 45% percent of Americans believe that God created human beings like us ~10,000 years ago. Indeed, less than a third of Americans believe that Darwin’s theory is supported by scientific evidence, and just as many believe that evolution is just one of several, equally valid theories. A third of Americans believe that the Judeo-Christian Bible is the word of God to be taken literally, word for word.

 more» 
24 February 2015
 
 
Who's Telling the Truth?
by Russ Gerber
 sub-topic» General

It’s a question that keeps crossing my mind as I scan the news. Do I believe the politicians I’m reading about, or the news anchor, or the sports figures, or the celebrity, or the health claims? Am I getting an honest view? How long until someone sifts through the allegations and evidence and comes to a conclusion? When will we get to the bottom of this?

 more» 
17 January 2015
 
 
You Can't Stop Free Speech
by Jocelynn Smith
 sub-topic» General

You don’t have to agree with the point of view published by Charlie Hebdo. But I respect their courage to speak and release new ideas into the world.

The free exchange of ideas cannot be stopped. Not by cowardly acts of terrorism. Not by acts of spying by our own government. Not by threats or bullying. Free speech is not just a right of Americans — it’s a right of human beings globally. Through the free expression and exchange of thoughts, concepts and opinions, we grow together. Technology advances. Health and well-being improve. Society — we hope — evolves.

And somewhere in the midst of this free flow of ideas, we come a little closer to the truth we are seeking.

 more» 
16 January 2015
 
 
The Importance of Free Speech to Human Progress
From Principia Mathematica to Charlie Hebdo
by Iain Murray
 sub-topic» General

It is exactly that goal — to help us determine what actually is, rather than what is simply asserted — that free speech and free inquiry make possible. As an institution of liberty, free speech must be defended wherever it is attacked. (My colleague Hans Bader has written elsewhere about letting down our guard.) Those who seek to suppress free speech want to keep mankind mired in poverty and ignorance, subject to their own whims and beliefs. They cannot be allowed to succeed.

 more» 
24 December 2014
 
 
"Anti-Islamisation" Movement in Germany: The Menacing Silence of the Lambs
by Mustela nivalis
 sub-topic» General

Mainstream conditioning is still working quite well in Germany, evidenced by the fact that the new protest group call themselves patriotic “Europeans” and not Germans. However, its grip on people’s minds is obviously loosening. It’s difficult at the moment to predict where all of this is leading. Support for PEGIDA is stronger in eastern Germany than in the old west. This may be because, due to their history, they have a keener sense for the Orwellian stuff going on all over the “occident”. Also, eastern Germany, like the rest of the old Warsaw Pact, was not subjected to the 60s cultural Marxism revolution – although interested parties are trying to make up for that, see the activities by the “Femen” harridans – so it is interesting that “gender mainstreaming” is in PEGIDA’s crosshairs along with all the stuff about immigration and strengthening of the police. The lack of cooperation with the media from such a spontaneous and public organisation is a significant and surprising new development. It could very well be part of what the website thedailybell.com has dubbed the “internet reformation”.

 more» 
30 November 2014
 
 
NUJ members under police surveillance mount collective legal challenge - Part 3
by the National Union of Journalists
 sub-topic» General

"This is not about terrorism, it is about criminalising dissent and those who would document it. The right to democratically protest and hold the state or corporations to account is being eroded. Our access to justice via legal aid is being cut and the journalists who shine a light on the crimes of the state and corporations are being targeted. It is not just about intimidation and surveillance, it is about the sinister way information can be shared and impact on our lives as we have seen with corporate blacklisting.

"Secret police, secret databases, secret courts – what kind of society are we living in? It is no surprise that they are coming after journalists, we have been campaigning hard about state incursions into press freedom. The campaign group 'I'm a Photographer Not a Terrorist', alongside a legal challenge in the European Court successfully saw the use of s44 of the Terrorism Act deemed unlawful. This blanket stop and search power was routinely used against the media to prevent us from doing our jobs.

 more» 
29 November 2014
 
 
NUJ members under police surveillance mount collective legal challenge - Part 2
by the National Union of Journalists
 sub-topic» General

"Individual police officers do a difficult job in often dangerous circumstances but this sort of behaviour by their force undermines good police work and public trust. If somebody was actually a criminal you'd understand the need to keep tabs on them, but I cannot see how reporters who cause inconvenience by doing our jobs could be legitimate targets for this sort of intrusion.

"In the disclosed information from my file there isn't even a hint that I'm suspected of any offence, nor do I have a criminal record. Instead the entries held about me contain such obvious statements as the fact I am 'always looking for a story' and 'has previously recorded police officers'.

 more» 
28 November 2014
 
 
NUJ members under police surveillance mount collective legal challenge - Part 1
by the National Union of Journalists
 sub-topic» General

Six NUJ members have discovered that their lawful journalistic and union activities are being monitored and recorded by the Metropolitan Police. They are now taking legal action against the Metropolitan Police Commissioner and the Home Secretary to challenge this ongoing police surveillance.

The NUJ members involved in the legal challenge include Jules Mattsson, Mark Thomas, Jason Parkinson, Jess Hurd, David Hoffman and Adrian Arbib.

All of them have worked on media reports that have exposed corporate and state misconduct and they have each also previously pursued litigation or complaints arising from police misconduct. In many of those cases, the Metropolitan Police Commissioner has been forced to pay damages, apologise and admit liability to them after their journalistic rights were curtailed by his officers at public events.

 more» 
12 November 2014
 
 
Umm, but why?
by Tim Worstall
 sub-topic» General

If they’re not breaking the law then they’re not doing anything wrong, are they?

We’ve got robust laws about incitement to violence and the rest. And the thing about this free speech stuff is the “free” that’s in the phrase. I am and should be allowed to say “lock up the filthy homos” however stupid, impolite or hateful it would be for me to say this. Just as Abu Hookhand is at liberty to discuss the finer points of stoning them or pushing a wall over on them. What neither of us may say is let’s go stone that filthy homo over there.

That’s just what free speech means.

 more» 
29 October 2014
 
 
Respect for Daddy
by David Hathaway
 sub-topic» General

But I think that most people would rather live in a world where they can speak the truth. Rather than accepting that “lying is a part of growing up” and that at a certain age you join the inner circle of adults that learn that lies and deceit represent the “cold hard reality about how the world really works,” non-sociopathic people feel better being able to speak openly about the moral reality that they clearly perceive in their minds. Breaking out of a lifestyle of deception into one of honest interaction definitely improves one’s outlook. And it is fun to talk openly to people and to not nibble around the edges when describing the 800-pound gorilla in the room. It is enjoyable to have friends that laugh at the state-supporting fallacies in the main stream media. In this day and age, you can actually have contact with those honest people that you didn’t even know existed in the past. Would you rather that your pool of associates shrinks down to a small un-talkative group that only rubber stamps in a short abbreviated fashion the collectivist conclusions of the day; or would you rather joyously discuss a brighter future with those who also excitedly discuss the logic and philosophy behind the world that surrounds us.

 more» 
08 October 2014
 
 
On Conspiracy Theories and "Non Violent Extremism"
by Concerned Briton
 sub-topic» General

I think these proposals are very frightening for free speech and association. I do not like Muslim radicals – who it is allegedly aiming at – but I would rather hear what they have to say than silence them. I also believe that it will not stop with Muslims, but it will be nationalists, it will be ‘radicals’ of any sort capable of overturning the apparatus of the state’s ideologies.

Maybe there needs to be some “radical dissent” in Britain……maybe the corruption and shapers of our future need to be overthrown and de-legitimised……but it seems that if the government has their way, anybody planning on forming a group (or hosting a meeting) could be prosecuted or locked up for extremism and “incitement”.

The establishment are losing the battle, otherwise this kind of thing would not be being discussed. It is plainly obvious that they are also discussing this within the EU and other parts of the world, for the same reasons. That is also worrying, and unfortunately for them, only strengthens the “paranoia” that there are genuine “conspiracies” in action.

 more» 
07 October 2014
 
 
David Cameron and Theresa May - Dangerous Nonsense
by Reinvestigate911.org
 sub-topic» General

A bizarre passage, unnoticed in David Cameron's UN speech, could be the first signal of government censorship plans and may lie behind Home Secretary Theresa May's plans announced this week for a clampdown on government designated "extremists" even when they do not advocate violence.

 more» 
30 August 2014
 
 
How a Tsunami of Information Inspired the Revolt of the Public - Part 3
by Martin Gurri
 sub-topic» General

The story I want to tell is simple but has many conflicting points of view. It concerns the slow-motion collision of two modes of organizing life: one hierarchical, industrial, and top-down, the other networked, egalitarian, bottom-up. I called it a collision because there has been wreckage, and not just in a figurative sense. Nations which a little time ago responded to a single despotic will now tremble on the edge of disintegration. I described it as slow motion because the two modes of being, old and new, have seemed unable to achieve a resolution, a victory of any sort. Both engage in negation – it is as a sterile back-and-forth of negation that the struggle has been conducted.

 more» 
28 August 2014
 
 
How a Tsunami of Information Inspired the Revolt of the Public - Part 2
by Martin Gurri
 sub-topic» General

Uncertainty is an acid, corrosive to authority. Once the monopoly on information is lost, so too is our trust. Every presidential statement, every CIA assessment, every investigative report by a great newspaper, suddenly acquired an arbitrary aspect, and seemed grounded in moral predilection rather than intellectual rigor. When proof for and against approaches infinity, a cloud of suspicion about cherry-picking data will hang over every authoritative judgment.

 more» 
26 August 2014
 
 
How a Tsunami of Information Inspired the Revolt of the Public - Part 1
by Martin Gurri
 sub-topic» General

The idea of an information explosion or overload goes back to the 1960s, which seems poignant in retrospect. These concerns expressed a new anxiety about the advance of progress, and placed in doubt the naïve faith, which I originally shared, that data and knowledge were identical. Even then, the problem was framed by uneasy elites: as ever more published reports escaped the control of authoritative sources, how could we tell truth from error? Or, in a more sinister vein, honest research from manipulation?

 more» 
16 July 2014
 
 
Self-Publishing: A Brief Guide for Beginners
by Sean Gabb
 sub-topic» General

All this being said, what about promotion? You’ve created your product. You’ve made it available. How do you sell it? Well, if this is the advice you’ve been waiting for, you’ll be disappointed. The generalities are easy. You need attention. You must tell everyone you know that you’ve published your book, and where to buy it. You must scatter free and discounted copies about like confetti at a wedding. You must beg for reviews on Amazon. You must get mentions and endorsements on the right blogs. You must start your own website and blog, and drive traffic to them. You must write articles like this, and get them published wherever you can. If you have other books out there, you must make sure that readers of one are never more than two clicks away from buying another. Mainstream publishers trade largely on their names. They can get hard copy into the shops with a single telephone call. If you’re going it alone, you need to be inventive with your marketing, and politely relentless. These are the generalities. It’s the specifics that are hard. They depend too much on who you are, where and when you are, and what you’ve written, to be explained in less than a book.

 more» 
30 May 2014
 
 
Frak! Has Your Mother Sold Her Mangle?
by Sarah Skwire
 sub-topic» General

This was such a perfect demonstration of the extension of Skwire’s First Law from politicians to those who enforce the laws enacted by politicians that I had to shelve my original plans and devote this week’s column to the question of cussing. (Skwire’s First Law, by the way, cannot be stated in Brighton, Michigan, without incurring a fine. Suffice it to say that it addresses my opinion of politicians.)

 more» 
07 May 2014
 
 
The Future of the Printed Book
by Sean Gabb
 sub-topic» General

While the future is unpredictable, we seem to be moving to a world in which printed books will survive in ways that gramophone records and videocassettes cannot. Books will be increasingly digital. E-book readers will become increasingly sophisticated and flexible. The technical problems will be solved. Main publication will be digital. The price of second hand paperbacks will continue heading toward zero. Printed books, though, will remain as luxury objects. Like expensive pens, they will be given as Christmas and birthday presents. Religious and classical texts will continue to be printed and owned and read.

More than I cannot say.

 more» 
23 March 2014
 
 
Strange bedfellows: Climate change deniers, newspapers partner in FOIA fight
by Alexis Sobel Fitts
 sub-topic» General

“By defining an exemption to the Virginia Freedom of Information Act (‘VFOIA’) as broadly as the lower court has done, this Court Would be, in effect, removing almost all public documents from the ambit of the records law,” reads the brief. By exempting Mann’s emails from public release, the group argues, the court is setting what journalists see as a dangerous precedent—making it much more difficult to gain access to public records.

 more» 
08 March 2014
 
 
A Win For Fair Use After Record Label, Copyright Lawyer Settle
by Laura Sydell
 sub-topic» General

In winning this tussle, Lessig was also able to score a larger victory for his cause. Liberation Music agreed to adopt new policies around issuing takedown notices. The label has promised to work with Lessig to improve its YouTube and copyright policies to make sure this doesn't happen again.

 more» 
04 December 2013
 
 
5 Reasons I Stopped Taking the News Seriously
by Paul Rosenberg
 sub-topic» General

Have you ever noticed that there is no competition between news networks involving accuracy? There are no Fact Wars between networks. They spend millions to make people respect their chief news reader, but they don’t point out each other’s factual errors.

So, I don’t respect them or take them seriously. And now you know why.

 more» 
10 November 2013
 
 
Market vs. Monopoly: Beating the "Intellectual Property" Racket
by Thomas L. Knapp
 sub-topic» General

These days, via Kickstarter, Indiegogo and hundreds of other web sites, “crowd-funding” is quickly becoming the way that artists and creators get their projects funded. The day is not far off when the standard way to get a book published or an album or movie released will be to go straight to the people who want to read, hear or watch it instead of to middlemen who bundle non-existent “rights” into packages that reward said middlemen far more than artists or audiences. When that model reaches full bloom,the “piracy” that dying class of middlemen complain about so much will be recognized as a feature, not a bug: Every “pirated” download potentially creating a new fan for the next round of crowd-funding and the creation of the next work.

 more»