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Today: Sun, November 23 2014  -  Last modified: April, 26 2007
 Taxes
22 February 2014
 
 
TPA at Ten
by Jonathan Isaby
 sub-topic» General

It's a bumper bulletin from all of us at the TaxPayers' Alliance this week as we have been marking the tenth anniversary of our founding by Matthew Elliott and Andrew Allum. We are hugely proud of the achievements we have notched up during our first ten years, which I wrote about here on Wednesday. But there is still so much for us to do in the fight for lower taxes and rooting out waste in the public sector, as the new edition of our Bumper Book of Government Waste reminds us. But before we come on to that, we'd love you to take a moment to watch our special tenth anniversary video, which you can watch by clicking here. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K38-IePAg48&feature=youtu.be)

 more» 
29 September 2012
 
 
Frankness About Wealth Redistribution
by Tibor R. Machan
 sub-topic» General

In any case, when governments confiscate resources from the people via taxation, the sort of wealth redistribution that Mr. Obama and other statists are avidly defending cannot be avoided. Taking their wealth and handing it out to some citizens for various purposes simply involves redistributing that wealth, period, be it justified or not.

Government’s redistribution of the citizens’ wealth is unavoidable unless taxation is abolished. Even the most minimal of taxation brings about such redistribution.

 more» 
29 July 2012
 
 
David Gauke Worked for Tax Avoidance Firm
by Guido Fawkes
 sub-topic» General

Tax efficient equity-based plans, eh? Like those used by investment bankers perchance? Gauke must have made a success of finding “innovative solutions” to reducing his clients’ tax bills as he appears to be held in high regard by his former colleagues:

Guido thinks Gauke should look in the mirror the next time he thinks about lecturing us on the morality of taxation…

 more» 
06 July 2012
 
 
The-Tax-Whose-Name-Shall-Not-Be-Spoken Begins
by Jo Nova
 sub-topic» General

ACCI’s director of economics and industry policy, Greg Evans, said yesterday the purpose of the carbon tax was to introduce a price signal into the market, but the Australian Competition & Consumer Commission was trying to prevent businesses from attributing increases to the impost.

“It’s basically saying to business: don’t attribute price rises to the carbon tax, otherwise we’ll come after you,” he said.

 more» 
01 April 2012
 
 
I may have to rethink my support for Pigou Taxes
by Tim Worstall
 sub-topic» General

I've not really made up my mind as yet, just rethinking my position. But it could be that Pigou Taxation just won't work because of politics. In the same way that Keynesian economics doesn't because of politicians: even if the entire economic analysis is correct there is never the political will in the booms to put aside money for the busts. And so it is with Pigou Taxes. They are correct in theory, of that there's no doubt.

But giving a politician a justification for a new tax is like giving a child a loaded machine gun: noisy, dangerous and very definitely a very bad idea.

 more»