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Today: Sun, December 21 2014  -  Last modified: April, 26 2007
 International Relations
25 July 2014
 
 
I Agree: The Horror is Caused by Government
by Don Boudreaux
 sub-topic» Migration

I emphatically am neither indifferent to, nor sanguine about, the horrors taking place today along the southern U.S. border. They disgust and sadden me. These horrors, though, are an artifact of the very political process that anti-immgrationists turn to as the means through which immigration into America is kept restricted. I assumed that this much is obvious.

The solution to this horrible problem is easy: open the U.S. borders, or at least return to the immigration regime we used until 90 years ago (the one symbolized by Ellis Island). No quotas; no numerical restrictions of any kind on immigration.

 more» 
20 July 2014
 
 
Open the Borders Now and Forever
by David S. D'Amato
 sub-topic» Migration

Furthermore, arguments that see open borders as “forced integration” are especially spurious and unconvincing within the context we’re presented today, where governments themselves own and administer most of the land and the rest has been doled out to political favorites under a process in which proper homesteading has never been a real or important consideration. In their essence, anti-immigration arguments come to the laughable contention that merely due to accidents of birth which place some lucky group in one favored locale and others somewhere else, the fortunate group ought to be able to control and impede the movement of others.

 more» 
07 June 2014
 
 
A Eugenic America
by Bryan Caplan
 sub-topic» Migration

Imagine a Eugenic America where citizens who earn less than median income are forbidden to have children. Enforcement isn't perfect, so 5% of all kids born are "illegals." Over time, this leads to a substantial stock of people who weren't supposed to be born in the first place.

 more» 
21 May 2014
 
 
Immigration Controls Bring Death and Misery
by Jacob G. Hornberger
 sub-topic» Migration

Open the borders to the free movements of people. Leave people free to come to the United States to travel, trade, tour, invest, and open businesses, and liberate Americans to travel, trade with, and visit overseas countries. Open borders are consistent with the Christian principle of loving one’s neighbor as thyself. They are consistent with the Golden Rule of treating others as you would have them treat you. They are consistent with the principles of economic liberty. They are consistent with economic prosperity.

What a tragedy. As a consequence of U.S. immigration controls, a 12-year-old girl is dead after trying to reunite with her parents, who were just trying to improve their lives. Something is definitely wrong with this picture.

 more» 
25 March 2014
 
 
Would (Our) Open Borders Lead to (Their) Closed Borders?
by Bryan Caplan
 sub-topic» Migration

Anna's question, though, is whether liberalizing immigration restrictions would lead to emigration restrictions. In countries that already restrict emigration, this scenario is easy to believe. But what about the vast majority of countries that don't currently restrict emigration? Would liberalization really lead more than a handful to this desperate and humiliating measure?

 more» 
14 October 2013
 
 
In Praise of Illegal Immigrants
by Skyler J. Collins
 sub-topic» Migration

Most conservatives and many "libertarians" decry the presence of illegal immigrants in the United States and elsewhere. They seemingly consider them to be less than human, calling them "illegals" with an air of contempt. It also seems that, to them, one of the worst crimes one could commit is the act of immigrating, that is "moving," without permission from the state. Are "illegals" less than human? Is their crime among the worst that can be committed? I give a resounding "NO!" in answer to both questions. In fact, I consider "illegals" to be the best residents a country can have. Here's why.

 more» 
04 September 2013
 
 
Open Borders is a Moderate Position
by Bryan Caplan
 sub-topic» Migration

As a practical matter, open borders is a radical position: If implemented, our economy and society would swiftly and dramatically change. As a philosophical matter, though, open borders is a moderate position. "Free to choose" stands between the extremes of "Mandatory" and "Forbidden." Open borders stands between the extremes of nationalist restriction and socialist mandate. Facebook clearly grasps the distinction: The individual who creates a group decides who's in and who's out. The critics of immigration really should stop talking as if this familiar option doesn't even exist.

 more» 
31 August 2013
 
 
The real reason we like immigration so much
by Sam Bowman
 sub-topic» Migration

Martha Gill has a good piece on immigration on the Telegraph Blogs site today, pointing out the simple fact that people often forget: the main reason immigration is such a good thing is that it's really, really good for immigrants.

 more» 
08 August 2013
 
 
Borders? What Borders? - Part 2
by Neil Lock
 sub-topic» Migration

Even this attitude, though, is only half way toward a fuller understanding. Slowly, people are starting to see today’s political society for what it is – a system in which a corrupt political class and its crony-capitalist hangers-on solicit just enough support from the lazy and the feckless to enable them to rule, without concern, over everyone else. And, once this insight is reached, national identity and fellow feeling can never be re-gained.

Further, how can the “UK” possibly be justified as a political unit? For, if an Englishman has a country, is his country not England, rather than some arbitrary construction called the “UK?” And if this “UK” was a natural political unit, then how could the partition of Ireland possibly have happened, and how could Scottish independence even be under discussion? (Let’s not even mention absorption into the EU…)

 more» 
07 August 2013
 
 
Borders? What Borders? - Part 1
by Neil Lock
 sub-topic» Migration

So in a libertarian world, land (and water, too) would, I think, become divided into two types of space. There would be private (owned) space, with borders and designated easements. And there would be public (open to all) space, made up of those easements. (There would also be, for a while at least, a third kind of space – un-owned, unclaimed space. But that, too, is open to all, so I will treat it as public space).

Furthermore, I expect there would be, ultimately, only one public space, which would be connected. That is, any point of it would be accessible from any other without leaving the public space.

 more» 
02 August 2013
 
 
Immigration freedom is personal liberty. Borders are statism
by Rad Geek
 sub-topic» Migration

When people move from one place to another without using violence, without trespassing on others’ land, and go to places where they’ve been invited to stay by mutual agreement with the property owner, that’s not an “invasion” in any meaningful sense of the word, any more than I “invaded” Michigan after I graduated from college, or any more than I “invade” the Waffle House when I go there to get some hash browns.

 more» 
28 June 2013
 
 
Immigration: The Practice of the Principle
by Don Boudreaux
 sub-topic» Migration

As Frank Buckley’s quotation above reveals, concern over the likely voting patterns of immigrants is nothing new. Past fears seem, from the perspective of 2013, to have been unjustified. Or, at the very least, the benefits immigrants from 1789-2013 have brought to America almost surely overwhelm whatever costs immigrants might have inflicted via the ballot box on the economy.

 more» 
20 February 2013
 
 
Should Amercians Emigrate or Defect?
by Wendy McElroy
 sub-topic» Migration

America is like the postwar city of Berlin. Borders are still open and they offer relatively free passage, officially or unofficially. But the wall is being built to close that porous border. Those who are planning to leave should decide if they are an emigrant or a defector. Otherwise the decision may be taken out of their hands and decided by the state.

 more»