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Today: Sat, April 19 2014  -  Last modified: April, 26 2007
 International Relations
29 March 2014
 
 
The Overlooked Story in Crimea
by Jeff D. Opdyke
 sub-topic» General

The American mindset, still brainwashed by Cold War hostilities, is quick to condemn anything the Russians do simply because it’s the Russians who did it. Again, I’m not implying Russia’s role in this affair is pure, and I’m not condoning Russia’s actions. Yet, we don’t condemn the Venetians for now wanting to leave Italy. We don’t condemn the Scots for wanting out of Britain. And we actually sided with what the U.S. originally labeled a terrorist organization in helping Kosovo secede from what was Yugoslavia.

We are inconsistent as a nation … and we are hypocritical. The only master America apparently serves is whichever one serves our national interest in the moment — and too often that means we act in contradictory ways that undermine American credibility at home and abroad.

 more» 
06 March 2014
 
 
Ukraine and the all-or-nothing EU
by Eamonn Butler
 sub-topic» General

Ukraine would undoubtedly gain from closer trading links with the EU, but the all-or-nothing nature of the deal would mean that the country's links to Russia and other non-EU countries would suffer, just as the UK's Commonwealth links did. And that, of course, is seen as a threat by Ukraine's large Russian-speaking population. And – never mind the political and defence implications, given the EU's close links with NATO – Russia does not want to see its trade with Ukraine cut back, any more than New Zealand did ours. So they see the future direction of Ukraine as a high-stakes game.

 more» 
04 February 2014
 
 
Who are the Bad Guys in Egypt?
by Jacob G. Hornberger
 sub-topic» General

For one thing, it’s not as though the militants targeted innocent civilians with their attack. They targeted a military helicopter, one that is owned and operated by the Egyptian military dictatorship. I thought that in war, military installations, troops, and vehicles are legitimate targets. Indeed, if revolutionaries can’t attack military targets without being called “terrorists,” then that begs the question: What targets are considered legitimate in a revolutionary war?

 more» 
21 October 2013
 
 
Want Peace? Promote Free Trade
by Julian Adorney
 sub-topic» General

Here in the United States, we talk a lot about spreading democracy. We invaded Iraq partly to “spread democracy.” A New York Times op-ed by Professor Dov Ronen of Harvard University claimed that “the United States has been waging an ideological campaign to spread democracy around the world” since 1989. One of the justifications for our international crusade is to make the world a safer place.

Perhaps we should spend a little more time spreading free trade instead. That might really lead to a more peaceful world.

 more» 
04 July 2013
 
 
Will the Real Traitors Please Stand Up
by Paul Craig Roberts
 sub-topic» General

Let’s quit calling the NSA the National Security Agency. Clearly, NSA is a threat to the security of every person in the entire world. Let’s call the NSA what it really is–the National Stasi Agency, the largest collection of Gestapo in human history. You can take for granted that every media whore, every government prostitute, every ignorant flag-waver who declares Snowden to be a traitor is either brainwashed or blackmailed. They are the protectors of NSA tyranny. They are our enemies.

The world has been growing increasingly sick of Washington for a long time. The bullying, the constant stream of lies, the gratuitous wars and destruction have destroyed the image hyped by Washington of the US as a “light unto the world.” The world sees the US as a plague upon the world.

 more» 
17 March 2013
 
 
The World is Not Billy Bob's Rib Pit
by Fred Reed
 sub-topic» General

The United States is the most hated country in the world, followed closely by Israel, and then by nobody. Wny? Why not Ecuador? China? Russia? East Timor? The hostility puzzles many Americans, who genuinely believe their country to be a force for good, a pillar of democracy, a defender of human rights.

 more» 
29 August 2012
 
 
What Africa needs is less "aid"
by Sean Gabb
 sub-topic» General

I do not support the present system of world trade. But give me a straight choice between this and the economics of the jungle that is fair trade, and I will choose the present system any day. Global corporatism may be unfair. But it does at least allow some wealth to be created. It does allow at least some rational economic calculation. Fair trade simply gives even more power to politicians and bureaucrats and favoured business interests in poor countries - that is, to the very people and interests that made and have kept these countries poor.

If you really want to improve the lives of the poorest, forget all this “kumbaya socialism” - which is a cocktail of bad economics and bad theology, accompanied by self-righteous candle-waving. Either settle for what we have - which, unfair as it is, delivers something - or campaign for a return to national and international voluntary exchange. Fair trade can never be fair. But free trade can be free.

 more» 
28 October 2011
 
 
Conservatives and American Empire
by Tim Kelly
 sub-topic» General

Perhaps the enthusiasm so many conservatives show for American militarism and adventurism abroad can be explained by their misunderstanding of the fundamental nature of the state.

As Murray Rothbard said, “the State is nothing more nor less than a bandit gang writ large.” It is naïve to expect a bunch of politicians and bureaucrats, largely shielded from public accountability, to provide something as ambiguous and vast as “national security” without turning the entire project into a giant pork-barrel scheme and making a general mess of things. But Rothbard was purged from the Right for his heresy of rejecting the Cold War consensus, and his libertarian insights were largely ignored by the postwar conservative movement.

 more» 
23 September 2011
 
 
I'm with the Turks
by Raedwald
 sub-topic» General

In stepping forward to display regional leadership in a post Arab-Spring Maghreb, and in the process crossing Israel's bows, Turkey has done exactly the right thing. A secular Islamic republic that brews some decent beers is exactly the model democracy that offers Israel the best bet for peace and security, and the best model for Egypt, Libya and the rest. We should encourage Turkey in developing a pivotal role astride the Bosphorus, as a regional power bridging Europe and Maghreb / Arabia.

 more»