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Today: Sun, September 21 2014  -  Last modified: April, 26 2007
 Individuals
10 September 2013
 
 
The life and legacy of Ronald Coase
by Vuk Vukovic
 sub-topic» General

Yesterday, at the age of 103, one of the greatest minds of our time, Nobel prize winner and emeritus professor at University of Chicago Law School Ronald Coase passed away.

His contributions to and influence on economic science are of monumental importance. His groundbreaking research has set the stage for a joint field of law and economics, and has also influenced the new institutional revolution in addition to a number of other fields and areas of research in economic theory.

 more» 
20 August 2013
 
 
An Open Letter to Bradley Manning
by Lawrence M. Ludlow
 sub-topic» General

I hope you know that you are in a long line of heroes, and your name will live far beyond that of anyone who imprisons you – all of them forgettable because of their faceless, nameless banal cruelty – which is so common that it is as forgettable as yesterday’s dirt. You are not forgettable. They can put you in a hole and try to hide you from the world, but your light shines out of it and acts as inspiration. You already know that Edward Snowden was inspired by you to expose even more lies, and he is making a laughing stock out of Obama and his supporters as well as the Republicans who are identical in their twisted behaviors.

 more» 
06 July 2013
 
 
Statement from Edward Snowden in Moscow
by WikiLeaks
 sub-topic» General

In the end the Obama administration is not afraid of whistleblowers like me, Bradley Manning or Thomas Drake. We are stateless, imprisoned, or powerless. No, the Obama administration is afraid of you. It is afraid of an informed, angry public demanding the constitutional government it was promised – and it should be.

 more» 
24 June 2013
 
 
Hero: Edward Snowden
by Michael Badnarik
 sub-topic» General

I would like to go on record thanking Edward Snowden for his act of courage on behalf of all freedom loving Americans. I am not the least bit surprised that our government has plans to extradite him from wherever they can catch him, and then drag him through a ridiculous kangaroo court before slamming him in prison. It is too late to prevent people from learning about the vast domestic surveillance project, so the government’s only remaining course of action is to vilify the one person brave enough to tell us the truth. Our hero, Edward Snowden.

 more» 
25 July 2012
 
 
Alexander Cockburn and the Radical Power of the Word
by John Nichols
 sub-topic» General

His last column for The Nation was a delicious takedown of all the dark players involved in the scheme by the biggest bankers in the world to fix rates. The bankers got their due, of course, but so did the regulators and, of course, the pliant media. “Now it turns out that the whole thing is a fix—a grimy hand all too visible,” Alex wrote. “Is is possible to reform the banking system? There are the usual nostrums—tighter regulations, savage penalties for misbehavior, a ban from financial markets for life. But I have to say I’m dubious. I think the system will collapse, but not through our agency.”

 more» 
07 March 2012
 
 
Charles Koch and his threat to libertarianism
by CLS
 sub-topic» General

Libertarianism is strong, but endangered. There is a concerted effort to take the libertarian revival and turn it into something other than libertarian. We see it from the so-called paleolibertarians, that gaggle of bigoted, anarcho-fundamentalists who distort and twist the idea of Ludwig von Mises to try and bolster their right-wing agenda. We see it from conservatives who have flooded libertarianism pushing neoconservative foreign policies and social conservatism, while pretending they are actually libertarian. Certainly Koch has done a lot to fund these latter fakes. Now Charles Koch has gone on the offensive, and offensive describes his actions in every sense of the word. He is now actively working to destroy the most effective libertarian organization in the world. As I see it, that makes him the most potent enemy to libertarianism around. He is trying to do what many far left, and far right, groups would love to do—take the Cato Institute out of the game. Charles Koch—you suck.

 more» 
19 January 2012
 
 
Martin Luther King's Public Philosophy of Freedom
by Tibor R. Machan
 sub-topic» General

It is much more sensible to attribute to Dr. King the more coherent view that if the freedom of individuals to do as they choose is properly respected and protected, they will be enjoying the first kind of freedom — freedom from others’ intrusions — and become capable of achieving freedom from poverty. Free men and women have generally been quite able to provide for themselves, perhaps with occasional voluntary help from their friends and neighbors. That is one of the lessons of history! It is entirely inappropriate to suggest that one person’s poverty authorizes others to take from those who have managed to achieve prosperity. I doubt that Martin Luther King Jr. didn’t grasp something so elementary — it is an insult to his memory to believe that.

Instead what seems to be happening is that people who are aspiring to rule others are invoking his good name for their coercive purposes. It would be a shame if this were tolerated by all those who admire Dr. King for his championing of human liberty.

 more» 
19 November 2011
 
 
Milton Friedman - libertarian or statist?
by Eamonn Butler
 sub-topic» General

Friedman thought of himself as a liberal rather than a libertarian, and 'the consistent liberal,' he once argued, 'is not an anarchist.' Human beings are not angels, in his view, so they need government to restrain them. He thought government had a wide role – to maintain law and order, dispense justice, define the rules of property, promote competition, maintain sound money, and protect the destitute. Equally, he believed that governments were too big, to avaricious, too centralised, too bloated, and far too likely to fail in anything they took on.

 more» 
14 October 2011
 
 
What Steve Jobs really gave us
by CLS
 sub-topic» General

Obama promised "hope" and delivered despair and depression. Steve Jobs promised little but delivered much. He was the epitome of the entrepreneur, a man who built a fortune by improving the lives of others. He did so without an army of lobbyists, seeking favors, subsidies or handouts. He got rich by enriching all of us.

Given how badly Obama and Congress has dealt with the economic crisis, I'm glad that someone else was out there giving people at least one reason to be hopeful.

 more»