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Today: Sun, November 29 2015  -  Last modified: April, 26 2007
26 September 2015
Austrian Economics and the Time for Monetary Freedom Part 3
by Richard Ebeling
 sub-topic» Austrian School

It is time for a radical denationalization of money, a privatization of the monetary and banking system through a separation of government from money and all forms of financial intermediation.

That is the pathway to ending the cycles of booms and busts, and creating the market-based institutional framework for sustainable economic growth and betterment.

It is time for monetary freedom to replace the out-of-date belief in government monetary central planning.

24 September 2015
Austrian Economics and the Time for Monetary Freedom Part 2
by Richard Ebeling
 sub-topic» Austrian School

Central banks around the world have all gravitated to the idea that the "ideal" rate of price inflation that assures economic stability and sustainability is around two percent per year. Fixated on averages and aggregates, the central bankers continue to give little or no attention to the really important influence their monetary policies have on economic affairs: the distortion of the structures of relative prices, profit margins, resource uses and capital investments.

22 September 2015
Austrian Economics and the Time for Monetary Freedom Part 1
by Richard Ebeling
 sub-topic» Austrian School

Interest rates manipulation has worked similarly to a price control keeping the price of a good below its market-determined and clearing level. It has undermined the motives and abilities of some people to save on the supply-side, while distorting demand-side decision-making in terms of both the types and time-horizons of possible investments to undertake, since the real scarcity and cost of borrowing for capital formation has been impossible to realistically estimate and judge in a financial market without market-based interest rates.

Markets have been distorted, investment patterns have been given wrong and excessive directions and labor and resources have been misdirected into various employments that will eventually be shown to be unsustainable.